Frequently Asked Questions

What is:

ADHD, or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, is a behavioral condition that makes focusing on everyday requests and routines challenging.

People with ADHD/ADD typically have trouble getting organized, staying focused, making realistic plans and thinking before acting. They may be fidgety, noisy and unable to adapt to changing situations.

Children with ADHD can be defiant, have difficulty in social situations with peers or adults, and/or can be aggressive.

Families considering treatment options should consult a qualified mental health professional for a complete review of their child’s behavioral issues and a treatment plan.

Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology

Autism is the most severe developmental disability. Appearing within the first three years of life, autism involves impairments in social interaction - such as being aware of other people’s feelings - and verbal and nonverbal communication.

Some people with autism have limited interests, strange eating or sleeping behaviors or a tendency to do things to hurt themselves, such as banging their heads or biting their hands.

Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology

Anxiety is an emotion characterized by feelings of tension, worried thoughts and physical changes like increased blood pressure.

People with anxiety disorders usually have recurring intrusive thoughts or concerns. They may avoid certain situations out of worry. They may also have physical symptoms such as sweating, trembling, dizziness or a rapid heartbeat.

Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology

Depression is more than just sadness. People with depression may experience a lack of interest and pleasure in daily activities, significant weight loss or gain, insomnia or excessive sleeping, lack of energy, inability to concentrate, feelings of worthlessness or excessive guilt and recurrent thoughts of death or suicide.

Depression is the most common mental disorder. Fortunately, depression is treatable.

Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology

Anger is an emotion characterized by antagonism toward someone or something you feel has deliberately done you wrong.

Anger can be a good thing. It can give you a way to express negative feelings, for example, or motivate you to find solutions to problems. But excessive anger can cause problems. Increased blood pressure and other physical changes associated with anger make it difficult to think straight and harm your physical and mental health.

Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology

Deena Abbe, Ph.D., is a graduate of the Hofstra University doctoral program in Clinical and School Psychology. She specializes in young children and families, from birth through adult. Her practice is located in Commack, New York.

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